Are We Killing Ourselves?

Are We Killing Ourselves?

ani-kolleshi-640938-unsplash+%281%29.jpg

Recently there has been a lot of talk about Artificial Intelligence and advances in technology such as bitcoin, cryptocurrency, and blockchain. But what does this mean for the average person, or a small business, or a manufacturer? Advanced technology is for people and businesses with deep pockets, right?

I recently hopped onto a webinar that was discussing how technology and manufacturing should be working together more to help save lives. Turns out, human error is blamed for the majority of deaths in hospital settings. Things like, the wrong prescription doses, machinery that is set up wrong (lack of user training), and the like.

martin-brosy-758535-unsplash (1).jpg



In 2013 I predicted “crowd-sourcing” for medical care, which I called a “fellowship” of services. My idea was that technology could not only make available any and all doctor knowledge without the MD risking losing his/her niche value, but it could take out the human bias when interviewing and gathering data. Imagine how much information is lost because we only interpret a portion of what is said. We miss critical data such as change in heart rate from triggers; or code words that children make up because they have no other way to explain what they don’t know but have experienced and know “something” is terribly wrong; or maybe that third opinion from yet another doctor appointment could have been the one that saved a life.

joseph-gruenthal-985586-unsplash.jpg


With technology, we can save lives. Manufacturing can focus on emerging technologies, something that is already beginning to happen through grants and investments into small start-up companies with big ideas. Some of what I envisioned for superior medical advances: doctors can be given a database to log in from home or the coffee shop to anonymously advise and get paid for their opinion though anonymous, searchable patient cases; manufacturing companies can automate services to reduce training efforts and get the technician back to what they do best: saving a life; computers can analyze critical data, searching for triggers and code words from previous interviews and include facial expressions, heart rate changes and common body language. It’s worth the extra cost to think about how your life could be affected when technology is used in ways that expand our capabilities. It’s time to stop predicting and take the time to act. Technology will only get cheaper and we will only get smarter from embracing the possibilities.

marcus-wallis-471449-unsplash.jpg




In addition to being The Olde Computer Guy’s Daughter, Amy Patt is a lecturer and writer on various topics including the future of medical facilities, women in business, how to run your own small business, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

The Return of Retail

The Return of Retail

What is Fin-Tech?

What is Fin-Tech?